Definitely not a college try. Bonneville, one of the better radio companies, and the Washington Post, one of the better newspapers, put together a radio station about 18 months ago in DC. WTWP was an attempt to bring the talent of the Post to the air on a daily basis. Next month the attempt ends, when Bonneville switches the frequencies to syndicated talk shows. A perfect example of radio’s commitment problem — if it doesn’t show in the Arbitron ratings within a year, it’s gone. The stories say Bonneville “lost” about 3 million dollars in the “experiment.” Pretty cheap programming overhead for a live talk station in DC, I’d say. The newspaper thought it could do radio without breaking a sweat, shuttling reporters through the studio. They said they’d give it three years. I’ve heard that before. Think you could create a new radio station out of a respected newspaper in a year and a half? I don’t. Somebody needs to do it. But I’d say the chances somebody will are now slim to none. Links: The Post‘s obit | The Washingtonian‘s story


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WASHINGTON POST RADIO; A JUNIOR HIGH TRY

RADIO GUY GALLERY


hertzsketch1
Heinrich Hertz's experiments proved the existence of electromagnetic radiation. Cycles-per-second, the standard measure of radio wave frequency, was named for him. He died in 1894, at 37. Wikipedia: Hertz

RADIO GUY GALLERY


STERN-3
What do you do with a problem like Howard? After decades of profits and FCC indecency fines as routine budget items, Howard Stern, king of all pottymouth radio guys, followed his enabler Mel Karmazin to Sirius Satellite Radio, leaving CBS to make up a hundred million in revenue (They sold stations) and fill the void for the half of Howard's loyal audience who didn't choose to buy a new radio and pay fifteen bucks a month for a few more, ranker epithets.
Wikipedia: Stern

RADIO GUY GALLERY


PALEY-S
CBS might have become the Cigar Broadcasting System. William S. Paley was the scion of the family business. In 1927, his cigar tycoon dad, Samuel, bought the struggling network of early radio stations from a group of poor schlumps who were trying to – would you believe: sell programming to radio stations! Every syndicator since has had to relearn that this doesn't work. Bill and his dad figured out the right business model -- you sell commercials to advertisers, and give the programs to stations. Got it?
Wikipedia: Paley
zenithfloor

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