At the National Association of Broadcasters Radio Show in Charlotte, David Rehr, new-ish president of NAB, introduced a new promotion campaign for radio. This comes at, maybe, exactly the right time — radio station owners are listening to the jungle telegraph and thinking about change, big corporate radio is lurching along in the money markets, heading for the Wall Street exits; and “HD” digital radio is still a pinpoint at the end of the tunnel. Radio’s still got a lot going for it, and just needs to sell itself on the need for improvement. Fortunately the trade orgs, who have traditionally provided the unity the industry lacks, have gotten themselves together and come up with something with, I believe, legs. Maybe now you’ll hear some news that balances out all the well-earned criticism radio has suffered. That’d be nice. And what would be nicer is if radio pros would loosen up on creativity and hometown-based programming.


SPEAK / ADD YOUR COMMENT
Comments are moderated.

XHTML: You can use these tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

Return to Top

REIGNITING RADIO;
TRADE ORGS TAKE THE BALL

RADIO GUY GALLERY


hertzsketch1
Heinrich Hertz's experiments proved the existence of electromagnetic radiation. Cycles-per-second, the standard measure of radio wave frequency, was named for him. He died in 1894, at 37. Wikipedia: Hertz

RADIO GUY GALLERY


STERN-3
What do you do with a problem like Howard? After decades of profits and FCC indecency fines as routine budget items, Howard Stern, king of all pottymouth radio guys, followed his enabler Mel Karmazin to Sirius Satellite Radio, leaving CBS to make up a hundred million in revenue (They sold stations) and fill the void for the half of Howard's loyal audience who didn't choose to buy a new radio and pay fifteen bucks a month for a few more, ranker epithets.
Wikipedia: Stern

RADIO GUY GALLERY


PALEY-S
CBS might have become the Cigar Broadcasting System. William S. Paley was the scion of the family business. In 1927, his cigar tycoon dad, Samuel, bought the struggling network of early radio stations from a group of poor schlumps who were trying to – would you believe: sell programming to radio stations! Every syndicator since has had to relearn that this doesn't work. Bill and his dad figured out the right business model -- you sell commercials to advertisers, and give the programs to stations. Got it?
Wikipedia: Paley
zenithfloor

ON AIR / LATEST POSTS

grundig