I was driving around my sometimes town yesterday, listening to KING-FM, Seattle’s unique (partly because it’s the city’s only) classical station. You too can hear it at KING.org. It was afternoon drive time and Sean MacLean was the host. A selection ended and Sean said, “Oh, here’s our program director, Bryan Lowe.” Lowe then proceeded to say that he had a surprise…after this message. Sound: MacLean’s teeth, grinding. After the commercials, Bryan announced that the surprise was a new release that had just come in the afternoon mail, and he brought it right in to play on the air. The reason I’m flagging this as a radio station health warning: Program Directors are supposed to neither be seen nor heard. They’re behind-the-sounds people. When you hear one take over the scheduled announcer’s show to play new music, you’re witnessing a certifiable outbreak of PD’s Disease — the affliction many or all program directors develop. It’s caused by the painful isolation of the former disc jockey who’s been promoted out of the limelight. Symptoms include promotional announcements that begin, “Hello, I’m ____, Program Director of ____….”, sudden appearances in the studio with the purpose of assuring themselves they can still do the job and remind the on-air worker that they really have the power, and the audience that they’re the real genius behind the programming. It’s a devastating disease, this PD’s scourge, frighteningly contagious, also infecting the announcer on duty with an inexpressible rage. Unfortunately, there is presently no known cure.


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LISTENING/SEATTLE: PROGRAM DIRECTOR’S DISEASE

RADIO GUY GALLERY


hertzsketch1
Heinrich Hertz's experiments proved the existence of electromagnetic radiation. Cycles-per-second, the standard measure of radio wave frequency, was named for him. He died in 1894, at 37. Wikipedia: Hertz

RADIO GUY GALLERY


STERN-3
What do you do with a problem like Howard? After decades of profits and FCC indecency fines as routine budget items, Howard Stern, king of all pottymouth radio guys, followed his enabler Mel Karmazin to Sirius Satellite Radio, leaving CBS to make up a hundred million in revenue (They sold stations) and fill the void for the half of Howard's loyal audience who didn't choose to buy a new radio and pay fifteen bucks a month for a few more, ranker epithets.
Wikipedia: Stern

RADIO GUY GALLERY


PALEY-S
CBS might have become the Cigar Broadcasting System. William S. Paley was the scion of the family business. In 1927, his cigar tycoon dad, Samuel, bought the struggling network of early radio stations from a group of poor schlumps who were trying to – would you believe: sell programming to radio stations! Every syndicator since has had to relearn that this doesn't work. Bill and his dad figured out the right business model -- you sell commercials to advertisers, and give the programs to stations. Got it?
Wikipedia: Paley
zenithfloor

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