That’s what you’ll hear on your favorite radio station these days. Behind the scenes, the American radio business is all fire and explosions. All the big deals that brought all the major radio stations in the country, and a lot of minor ones, under a few corporate tents are unravelling, as the numbers-jugglers try to make the numbers add up the only way they know how — by firing people. Which, in radio, is like closing plants in the car business. The difference: the listeners are still there. The advertisers are still willing to advertise. Sure, the slowing economy doesn’t help. But, overpaying for radio stations and overpromising Wall Street is what’s killing the radio business much faster than its multiple new cyber-competitors could ever hope to do. Want details? Surf the radio trade publications — they’re over there in the right column. Your radio station won’t sound too different, unless you’re in a major market where even successful talent is being booted out. Those stations will sound different, and I don’t mean better. The light at the end of radio’s tunnel has turned out to be an incinerator.


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Laughing on the outside.

RADIO GUY GALLERY


hertzsketch1
Heinrich Hertz's experiments proved the existence of electromagnetic radiation. Cycles-per-second, the standard measure of radio wave frequency, was named for him. He died in 1894, at 37. Wikipedia: Hertz

RADIO GUY GALLERY


STERN-3
What do you do with a problem like Howard? After decades of profits and FCC indecency fines as routine budget items, Howard Stern, king of all pottymouth radio guys, followed his enabler Mel Karmazin to Sirius Satellite Radio, leaving CBS to make up a hundred million in revenue (They sold stations) and fill the void for the half of Howard's loyal audience who didn't choose to buy a new radio and pay fifteen bucks a month for a few more, ranker epithets.
Wikipedia: Stern

RADIO GUY GALLERY


PALEY-S
CBS might have become the Cigar Broadcasting System. William S. Paley was the scion of the family business. In 1927, his cigar tycoon dad, Samuel, bought the struggling network of early radio stations from a group of poor schlumps who were trying to – would you believe: sell programming to radio stations! Every syndicator since has had to relearn that this doesn't work. Bill and his dad figured out the right business model -- you sell commercials to advertisers, and give the programs to stations. Got it?
Wikipedia: Paley
zenithfloor

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