Dive into the archives.


  • MY NEW TAGLINE

    I just updated the description of this Website’s purpose. I started out thinking this would be just a site about U.S. broadcast radio, which is where I started my so-called career. I’ve decided it ought to be a little broader, since, for one thing, “radio” isn’t a closed system anymore. Used to be you had […]

  • ARBITRON’S PEOPLE METER IN THE DITCH

    Enough radio biggies have raised enough Cain now, so Arbitron, the radio ratings monopoly, has delayed the rollout of its new electronic listening-spy gadget. In its initial outings, some stations that appeal to young adults digitally lost their audiences. Arbitron’s been trying desperately to juggle their samples to try to keep the customers simply peeved […]

  • PANDORA: AN IDEA FOR RADIO PEOPLE TO STEAL…BACK

    At one time, disc jockeys were hired for their talent as entertainers, and their love of, and feel for, music. Pandora.com has taken the music idea and run with it. Pandora is the offspring of the Music Genome Project, where musicologists have developed a method of classifying recordings by their musical and performance characteristics. An […]

  • DIGITAL NIGHT SOUNDS — A NEW BUG FOR AM RADIO.

    We’re in the midst of a digital revolution in all media, and radio is no exception. You’re hearing about “HD Radio.” But not hearing much of it yet, because U.S radio is just now switching over to digital broadcasting, and the price of a digital radio receiver is still ridiculous. But these are not the […]

  • WORDS FOR RADIO PEOPLE, NO. 1

    We define our world by the names we give things. Change the names–the words–and you change the way you think. Here’s today’s Word for Radio People:  Stop calling the town you work in a “market.” Start calling it a “city.” Or call it your “home town.” Say “here.” Better yet, call it by its given […]

  • RADIO RATINGS GO DIGITAL. UH OH.

    Now, instead of filling out diaries about your radio listening, Arbitron asks selected people to carry a gadget that listens to your radios and reports back automatically to the master computer. This is supposed to be better for radio and its advertisers, because it cuts out the middle-memory–your suspect recollection of what station you listened […]

  • PAY FOR PLAYS; RADIO TRIES TO FIGHT IT OFF.

    As long as radio stations have played records, they’ve been paying royalties to songwriters, through ASCAP and BMI, the music publishing collection agencies. Thanks to the storm stirred up by Internet song-trading, the artists and the recorded music industry want to be paid by on-air radio too. Radio, of course, is trying to fight it […]

  • KNDO-TV LISTENS, GETS AN EARFUL; A CAUTIONARY TALE.

    I went to a community listening session put on by one of our Yakima (Washington) TV stations today–KNDO-TV–at a senior center, but others attended. I’d guess the attendee count at about twelve, almost matched by nine station employees–an impressive turnout by the station: the manager, news director, three sales managers, a sales assistant (She wrote […]

November

This is the archive for November, 2007.

RADIO GUY GALLERY


hertzsketch1
Heinrich Hertz's experiments proved the existence of electromagnetic radiation. Cycles-per-second, the standard measure of radio wave frequency, was named for him. He died in 1894, at 37. Wikipedia: Hertz

RADIO GUY GALLERY


STERN-3
What do you do with a problem like Howard? After decades of profits and FCC indecency fines as routine budget items, Howard Stern, king of all pottymouth radio guys, followed his enabler Mel Karmazin to Sirius Satellite Radio, leaving CBS to make up a hundred million in revenue (They sold stations) and fill the void for the half of Howard's loyal audience who didn't choose to buy a new radio and pay fifteen bucks a month for a few more, ranker epithets.
Wikipedia: Stern

RADIO GUY GALLERY


PALEY-S
CBS might have become the Cigar Broadcasting System. William S. Paley was the scion of the family business. In 1927, his cigar tycoon dad, Samuel, bought the struggling network of early radio stations from a group of poor schlumps who were trying to – would you believe: sell programming to radio stations! Every syndicator since has had to relearn that this doesn't work. Bill and his dad figured out the right business model -- you sell commercials to advertisers, and give the programs to stations. Got it?
Wikipedia: Paley
zenithfloor

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